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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! I recently heard the news about the R7 and am very curious about the new bike.
3 of my 4 motorcycles have been Yamahas. I currently ride a 2004 YZF-R1, but my last two bikes were a 2003 YZF-R6 and a 1999 YZF-R6.

I'm a little sad to see the R6 go, but I had noticed prices creeping up for a couple of years, so it is a good thing that manufacturers have found a way to make mid range motorcycles more accessible in terms of price.
 

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Previously 2001 Suzuki TL1000R, On Order: 2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 BLue, On order: 2022 Honda Grom Yellow.
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I have lots of silver in my hair too, and been riding a liter bike for a long time(Suzuki TL1000R). Very much looking forward to a middleweight supersport for my future that is not like an R6, GSXR 600, CBR600RR, ZX6R... I REALLY like supersport twins. An R7 is reserved in my name and Yamaha USA just sent me a text this morning to make sure I've connected with a local dealer already in order for them to know where to send my bike.

Lots of us were hoping that Suzuki would come around and put the basic modern hardware on the SV650S, but that never materialized in over 20 years! The R7 basically looks like what a lot of us super-twins guys were hoping the SV would turn into. oh well... Yamaha gets my money instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nothing against Yamaha (as I've owned 3 of them, in addition to an old DTX drum kit), but if I were looking for something to ride off into the sunset in my old age (i'm not there yet) then I'd probably look at a VFR800 or 1200. I haven't ridden many modern bikes (not much in the way of demo days around here in the past few years) but I have a superstitious fear of ABS (had it on one of my cars and it would act up frequently until I yanked the fuse to disable it). The VFR is a sporty looking tourer with a banana seat and more than enough accessories available to scratch lots of itches for touring or around-towning.

I haven't ridden the MT07, and I am curious as to how the R7 will compare in terms of riding feel to the SV650, R6 and Ninja 650R (specs suggest it will ride similarly to the ninja 650R).
 

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Previously 2001 Suzuki TL1000R, On Order: 2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 BLue, On order: 2022 Honda Grom Yellow.
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Wow, you and I have a lot of common thoughts in there with regard to exploring options.

Concerning the SV650,they all have a basic damper rod fork. It needs a GSXR front end. I've owned one, and ridden more, and it really does need the help both for suspension and brakes. They are good enough for just normal street riding though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow, you and I have a lot of common thoughts in there with regard to exploring options.
I guess? I got to ride the first generation of the crossplane R1 (2009), the 2010 FZ8, a super tuned 2010 Honda 1000RR, and a few Ducatis, BMWs, Suzukis and Kawasakis (including a ZX-14) and others. I have also put about 50,000 miles on my current bike (commuted on it year round for many years) so I've had a good amount of time to forum opinions about

Simplicity and reliability are underrated unless you have a lot of free time and lots of disposable income. My favorite ~600 was the Triumph Daytona 675 followed closely by the 2006 GSXR600. The bike that made me want to act irresponsibly was the Ducati 1098 (that bike is DA DEVIL!). I've never been a speed demon, but torque at cruising speed is important if you're riding on large highways (the traffic in Atlanta is legendary), and maneuverability is a good tool to have available to extricate yourself from sticky situations. The VFR1200 seems to be well suited for with the single disadvantage of heavy curb weight. (590 lbs wet compared to ~440 lbs for most 1000cc sportbikes). Just make sure you watch how you park so that you don't have to back it up a big incline
 

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Previously 2001 Suzuki TL1000R, On Order: 2022 Yamaha YZF-R7 BLue, On order: 2022 Honda Grom Yellow.
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Simplicity and reliability are underrated unless you have a lot of free time and lots of disposable income.
Indeed, its why I passed on the Aprilia RS660, and put the deposit on the R7. Technology is great, when it works. When it doesn't work, its a big curse(so reliability is more of a priority for me, and Aprilia doesn't have that great of a record). Not to mention its great to have a good support network and available parts.
 
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